May 9th Webinar with Dr. Emily Wimberger on Cap and Trade

Invitation to a Webinar with Dr. Emily Wimberger    

Cap and Trade – An Introduction

Wednesday, May 9, 12:00-1:00 PM PDT

Cap and trade systems are the dominant method of pricing carbon globally. The enormous markets of the European Union and China use cap and trade, and California, with the sixth largest economy in the world, also has a cap and trade system with an effective price on 85% of its emissions. Currently the California system is trading allowances with Quebec and Ontario, possibly extending trade to other Canadian provinces, U.S. states, and even Mexico.

RSVP to join us on Wednesday, May 9, 12:00-1:00 pm PDT, for an informative presentation on how carbon pricing can be a major element in reducing carbon emissions. Dr. Emily Wimberger, chief economist at the California Air Resources Board, tasked with managing California’s cap and trade system, will give an overview of California’s cap and trade system.

Registration for the webinar is limited to 100 people, so sign up early. Register here.

Webinars are hosted by the LWVUS Price on Carbon Steering Committee and PriceonCarbon.org. Webinars are designed to help us learn more about pricing carbon and why scientists, economists and world leaders view pricing carbon as an essential strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 

Recordings of our previous webinars are available on the Price on Carbon website here.

May 9th Webinar with Dr. Emily Wimberger on Cap and Trade

Invitation to a Webinar with Dr. Emily Wimberger    

Cap and Trade – An Introduction

Wednesday, May 9, 12:00-1:00 PM PDT

Cap and trade systems are the dominant method of pricing carbon globally. The enormous markets of the European Union and China use cap and trade, and California, with the sixth largest economy in the world, also has a cap and trade system with an effective price on 85% of its emissions. Currently the California system is trading allowances with Quebec and Ontario, possibly extending trade to other Canadian provinces, U.S. states, and even Mexico.

RSVP to join us on Wednesday, May 9, 12:00-1:00 pm PDT, for an informative presentation on how carbon pricing can be a major element in reducing carbon emissions. Dr. Emily Wimberger, chief economist at the California Air Resources Board, tasked with managing California’s cap and trade system, will give an overview of California’s cap and trade system.

Registration for the webinar is limited to 100 people, so sign up early. Register here.

Webinars are hosted by the LWVUS Price on Carbon Steering Committee and PriceonCarbon.org. Webinars are designed to help us learn more about pricing carbon and why scientists, economists and world leaders view pricing carbon as an essential strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 

Recordings of our previous webinars are available on the Price on Carbon website here.

LWV on the proposed citizenship question on the 2020 Census

This email came from Chris Carson, President of the League of Women Voters, on March 27th:

Late last night it was announced that the Commerce Department has made the decision to include a question pertaining to citizenship in the 2020 Census.

Make no mistake: this decision isn’t about improving demographic data on citizenship.

It’s designed to frighten immigrants—citizens and noncitizens alike—so they won’t participate in the Census. It’s a blatant political maneuver meant to disenfranchise these groups and deny them equal representation.

Including this question on the Census undermines the rights of eligible voters and threatens a process vital to our democracy.

For more than 200 years, the Census has collected information about the geographic distribution of our population so we can provide representation and invest in our communities equitably.

Without a complete count of our nation’s people, businesses will not have the tools to make sound investment decisions that keep our communities thriving.

The United States Constitution mandates an accurate count of all people living in the United States – not all citizens. Non-citizens are an integral part of our economy and need to be included in the 2020 Census to paint a complete picture of our great country.

The clock is ticking toward 2020.

So what are the League’s positions on gun control?

This statement below is from the national League website.  For a history of the League’s study and action on gun control, click here: LWVUS on Gun Control

The League’s Position

Statement of Position on Gun Control, as Adopted by 1990 Convention and amended by the 1994 and 1998 Conventions:

The League of Women Voters of the United States believes that the proliferation of handguns and semi-automatic assault weapons in the United States is a major health and safety threat to its citizens. The League supports strong federal measures to limit the accessibility and regulate the ownership of these weapons by private citizens. The League supports regulating firearms for consumer safety.

The League supports licensing procedures for gun ownership by private citizens to include a waiting period for background checks, personal identity verification, gun safety education and annual license renewal. The license fee should be adequate to bear the cost of education and verification.

The League supports a ban on “Saturday night specials,” enforcement of strict penalties for the improper possession of and crimes committed with handguns and assault weapons, and allocation of resources to better regulate and monitor gun dealers.

National Program Planning by LWVN

Every two years, local Leagues get to weigh in on the priorities at the national level.  It’s that time of year, and we’ll have our discussion as part of our Board meeting on Wednesday night (yes, Valentine’s Day) at Pat Acton’s house, 48 Miller Road starting around 8 pm.  Please let us know in advance if you plan to come at info@lwvnewton.org.

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